Grammatical Gender in English

Grammatical Gender for English Skype Lessons

English Grammar – Grammatical Gender

In Latin, Greek, German, and many other languages, some general rules are given that names of male beings are usually masculine, and names of females are usually feminine. There are exceptions even to this general statement, but not so in English. Male beings are, in English grammar, always masculine; female, always feminine.

When, however, inanimate things are spoken of, these languages are totally unlike our own in determining the gender of words. For instance: in Latin, hortus (garden) is masculine, mensa (table) is feminine, corpus (body) is neuter; in German, das Messer (knife) is neuter, der Tisch (table) is masculine, die Gabel (fork) is feminine.

The great difference is, that in English the gender follows the meaning of the word, in other languages gender follows the form; that is, in English, gender depends on sex: if a thing spoken of is of the male sex, the name of it is masculine; if of the female sex, the name of it is feminine. Hence:

Gender is the mode of distinguishing sex by words, or additions to words.

It is evident from this that English can have but two genders: masculine and feminine.

 

Further readinghttp://www.myenglishpages.com/site_php_files/grammar-lesson-masculine-feminine.php